Collaborative Team work is integrated in the heart of the software; it is up to the user to choose how he shares his work.

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Specialized Embedded systems are the target domains; the first developments therefore focus on ARM, Dalvik, ELF and Java.

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Expandable Two APIs (C and Python) are available for building extensions to meet specific needs.

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Interfaces Chrysalide is the right tool for the purists of command line as well as the GUI fans.

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Innovation Reverse engineering is a complex activity that requires a great amount of intelligence and research.

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Ecosystem Functionally, Chrysalide is based on Free Software and integrates as much as possible into existing environments.

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One year later three directions for Chrysalide

More than one year has passed since the last blog post.

No news, good news.

A lot of improvements have been committed, as the statistics show:

git diff --stat 3d2576f..HEAD | tail -1
 1818 files changed, 62736 insertions(+), 68424 deletions(-)

A small Python script has also been created to plot the development activity for 2018:

The number of past and incoming evolutions is quite huge, so here is a quick summary of three major changes.

The following article is based on commit ce43a13d, so you can give this version of Chrysalide a try by running:

git clone http://git.0xdeadc0de.fr/chrysalide.git
cd chrysalide
git checkout ce43a13d

As usual, the next step is to follow the installation procedure.

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Posted on April 30, 2018 at 16:18

How to reduce memory consumption in your own disassembler and other stories

There is a common point that all software products share in their development cycles: features are regularly added, code (mostly) works but at a given time some parts of the product need to be rewritten.

The root causes are multiple: refactoring, API update, aso. In the Chrysalide's case scaling was a huge problem that prevents the final user to load large binaries without many RAM available.

The last weeks have seen many improvements about this concern, so here is a few hints to make your own disassembler more memory-friendly!

The following news is based on commit 3d2576f, so you can give this version of Chrysalide a try by running:

git clone http://git.0xdeadc0de.fr/chrysalide.git
cd chrysalide
git checkout 3d2576f

→ Read next...

Posted on May 27, 2017 at 15:42.